03 Nov

Guy Fawkes and the Gunpowder plot

guy_fakes_001 Timeline Trip London

In 1605, Guy Fawkes and a band of Catholic conspirators set out to destroy King James I and the ruling elite trying to blow up the Houses of Parliament.

After Queen Elizabeth I died in 1603, English Catholics who had been persecuted under her rule had hoped that her successor, James I, would be more tolerant of their religion. James I had, after all, had a Catholic mother. Unfortunately, James did not turn out to be more tolerant than Elizabeth and a number of young men, 13 to be exact, decided that violent action was the answer.

A small group took shape, under the leadership of Robert Catesby. Catesby felt that violent action was warranted. Indeed, the thing to do was to blow up the Houses of Parliament. In doing so, they would kill the King, maybe even the Prince of Wales, and the Members of Parliament who were making life difficult for the Catholics.

guy_fakes_001 Timeline Trip London

To carry out their plan, the conspirators got hold of 36 barrels of gunpowder and stored them in a cellar, just under the House of Lords. But as the group worked on the plot, it became clear that innocent people would be hurt or killed in the attack, including some people who even fought for more rights for Catholics. Some of the plotters started having second thoughts. One of the group members even sent an anonymous letter warning his friend, Lord Monteagle, to stay away from the Parliament on November 5th.

guy_fakes_002 Timeline Trip London

The warning letter reached the King, and the King’s forces made plans to stop the conspirators. Guy Fawkes, who was in the cellar of the parliament with the 36 barrels of gunpowder when the authorities stormed it in the early hours of November 5th, was caught, tortured and executed.

Nowadays, Guy Fawkes Day is celebrated in the United Kingdom, and in a number of countries that were formerly part of the British Empire, with fireworks, bonfires and parades.

guy_fakes_003 Timeline Trip London

Even Hollywood has adapted the story in V for Vendetta, where the Guy Fawkes mask is used by the main character. After that, the mask has become a symbol against oppression and the established order.

guy_fakes_004  Timeline Trip London

Play the Gundpowder game:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/interactive/games/gunpowder/index.shtml

More info in bonfirenight.net

27 Aug

The Great Fire of London, 350 commemorations

Great Fire 350 is an umbrella season of events marking the 350th anniversary of the Great Fire of London.

At the centre of this is London’s Burning, a festival of arts and ideas produced by Artichoke. It is supported by founding sponsor the City of London Corporation and with an award from Arts Council England’s Ambition for Excellence programme.

What is London’s Burning?

At the centre of the Great Fire 350 commemorations, London’s Burning reimagines the Great Fire of 1666 through the vision of contemporary artists, writers and thinkers. Experience spectacular installations, talks and events from 30 August to 4 September.

You can find all the information here.

02 Dec

Timeline Trip has a new version with more points !!!

Timeline Trip 2,0

Some Apple customers reported that upgrading to iOS 9 have caused some apps and, in some instances, their entire devices to crash, rendering their devices practically useless.

The latest issue covers a wide range of situations. While some users report having only their apps affected, others say the entire system on their devices was not functioning properly.

The only issue that affected Timeline Trip was the translation but affortunately we were working in new interesting points and we could take advantages to fix this problem caused by the same Apple. Therefore here there is the new version of Timeline Trip London and Timeline Trip Edinburgh in both Operative Systems, Android and iOS with new interesting points.

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29 Oct

Poppy, what for?

The poppy has a long association with Remembrance Day, the day to commemorate soldiers who have died in war.

In late 1914, the fields of Northern France and Flanders were once again ripped open as World War One raged through Europe’s heart. Once the conflict was over the poppy was one of the only plants to grow on the otherwise barren battlefields.

Blood Swept Lands and a Sea of Red

The poppy came to represent the immeasurable sacrifice made by all the soldiers in the Great War and quickly became a lasting memorial to those who died in World War One and later conflicts. It was adopted by The Royal British Legion as the symbol for their Poppy Appeal, in aid of those serving in the British Armed Forces, after its formation in 1921. The poppy helps to provide thousands of modern veterans, Service men, women and their families with vital advice and support.

Timeline Trip tower_of_london_memorial_005

In 2014, commemorating the centenary of the outbreak of World War I, the moat of the Tower of London housed a temporaly work of installation art known as Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, title taken from the first line of a poem by a World War I soldier. It consisted of 888,246 individually hand-made ceramic red poppies, each intended to represent one British or Colonial serviceman killed in the War, that were arranged to resemble a pool of blood which appeared to be pouring out of a bastion window. In fact, the moat itself was used in the early days of the war as a training ground for City of London workers who had enlisted to fight

Timeline Trip tower_of_london_memorial_002The poppies were added to the installation progressively by volunteers. The first one was planted on 17 July, and the work was unveiled on 5 August, coinciding with the centenary of Britain’s entry into the war. The last one was planted on 11 November, the Remembrance Day. An estimated five million people saw the memorial before it started to be removed after the Remembrance Day. Every ceramic poppie was sold for £25 each and the huge profit was shared between six service charities.”

tower_of_london_memorial_003 Timeline Trip

Find out more stories like this one with Timeline Trip London

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20 Oct

Assasin’s Creed Syndicate within Victorian London

Today we want to talk to you about Assassin’s Creed, a historical fiction action-adventure open world stealth video game serie.

Set within London in 1868 during the Industrial Revolution, the story follows twins Jacob and Evie Frye as they navigate the corridors of organized crime during the Victorian era and fight against the established order, controlled by the Templars.

Plot

In 1868, at the tail end of the Industrial Revolution, with the Assassin Brotherhood all but eradicated, twins Jacob (Paul Amos) and Evie Frye (Victoria Atkin) leave Crawley for London and arrive to find a city controlled by the Templars, with both the Church and the Monarchy losing their power. Raised as Assassins to follow the Creed, Jacob and Evie aim to take back the city from Templar control by infiltrating and uniting London’s criminal underworld, aided by notable figures of the era such as novelist Charles Dickens, biologist Charles Darwin, inventor Alexander Graham Bell, Nurse Florence Nightingale, Duleep Singh, the last maharajah of the Sikh Empire and Queen Victoria.

Here you can see a video to compare real life vs. in-game. It is a great art job which can help us to see how London was at that time. We encourage you to download our app and get to know some of the charater mentioned above and more stories about the city, with hundred of ilustrations.

Find out the more characters and stories about Victorian era with Timeline Trip London

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05 Jul

Sweeney Todd, the demon barber of London

sweeney_todd 01, Timeline Trip London

The demon barber of Fleet Street

According to legend which first appeared in 1846 in a story titled The String of Pearls, Sweeney Todd was a barber believed to have murdered more than 150 of his customers at his barber shop situated at number 186 Fleet Street. Once they were sat in his barber’s chair, he cut his victims throats from ear to ear and dispatched them by pulling a lever which made them fall backward down a revolving trapdoor into the basement of his shop where he stealed all their valuables.

Helped by his lover Mrs Lovett, who ran a pie shop in nearby Bell Yard which was connected to Todd’s barber shop by a secret underground passage, she assisted him in disposing of the bodies by baking their flesh into meat pies and selling them to the unsuspecting customers of her pie shop.

A String of Pearls or The Friend of Fleet Street (1847), Britannia, Hoxton.  Sweeney Toddsweeney_todd 01, Timeline Trip London sweeney_todd_fleet_street_19th_century, A String of Pearls or The Friend of Fleet Street (1847), Britannia, Hoxton.  Sweeney Toddsweeney_todd 01, Timeline Trip London

Find out more stories like this one in Timeline Trip London

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24 Jun

Royal Albert Hall, London

The success of the Great Exhibition of 1851 held in Hyde Park led Prince Albert to propose the creation of a permanent series of facilities dedicated to the promotion of Art and Science for the enlightenment of the public in the area. Following this purpose, the foundation stone of the Royal Albert Hall was laid in May 1867 by Queen Victoria.

Royal Albert Hall 001

Royal Albert Hall 001

Constructed mainly of red brick with terra cotta block decoration, the building is an ellipse in plan with a 41 metres high glass and wrought-iron dome originally designed with a capacity for 8,000 people.

The Queen opened the Royal Albert Hall on 29 March 1871. During the opening concert the Hall’s acoustic problems became immediately apparent and, despite several attemps to solve the strong echo, the acoustics were not properly tackled until 1969 when a series of large fibreglass acoustic diffusing discs (commonly known as “mushrooms”) were installed below the ceiling. It used to be jokingly said that the Hall was

“the only place where a British composer could be sure of hearing his work twice”.

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Today, it is considered one of the most distinctive buildings in the UK and each year it hosts more than 350 events including classical concerts, rock and pop, ballet and opera, sports, award ceremonies, school and community events, charity performances and banquets.

Timeline Tirp London