10 Jun

One of the “8 Essential Apps For Living In Edinburgh”

Timeline Trip Edinburgh App Screenshots

Recently we have discovered an article which title says “8 Essential Apps For Living In Edinburgh” and We are delighted to say that Timeline Trip Edinburgh is one of them.

Here you can read what they say about the app.

“In an age where apps appear in abundance and storage space is of the essence, it’s useful to separate the best from the rest. Whether tech guru or unashamedly old school, have a gander at the best apps to download for living in Edinburgh. Trust us, it will open up a whole new wealth of adventures…

Timeline Trip Edinburgh

Giving substance to the saying ‘blast from the past’, Timeline Trip Edinburgh enables app-goers to rewind to a bygone moment, while soaking up a whole bunch of accurate and riveting historical facts. Take your pick from all the eras and prepare to get carried away with all the interactive fun in map form. The perfect and coolest self-guided tour.”

Discover the rest of the “Essential apps for living in Edinburgh” reading the original article.

25 Jan

Robert Burns night, 15 moments of the night

Robert Burns Timeline Trip Edinburgh

Also known as Rabbie Burns, is the Scotland’s favourite son. He is considered one of the most celebrated Scottish poet Included in the Romantic Movement in the 18th century, Burns wrote his poems in both English and Scots languages.

Robert Burns became popular because he wrote about the Scottish culture and tradition and his works are still celebrated not only in Scotland but also in different English speaking countries such as the United States or Australia.

Robert Burns Timeline Trip Edinburgh

His most popular works are “Auld Lang Syne”, “Scots Wha Hae”, “Tam O’Shanter” among others. His figure is remembered every 25th of January, Burns’ day of birth, called Robert Burns’ Night which consists in having Haggis as a dinner and cut open singing one of his famous poems “Address tae the haggis”.

Haggies Timeline Trip Edinburgh

Here is a typical run through and description of what is involved in a Burns Supper:

1. Piping in the top table

At formal gatherings, it is traditional for the top table guests to be piped in. However, at a smaller and less formal gathering, you can play some Scottish music, traditional bagpipe music or your favourite contemporary Scottish band, and clap along to welcome your guests.

2. Welcome

The selected Chairman or Speaker acts as Master of Ceremonies for the evening and welcomes the guests – the host of an informal evening usually takes this role. The Chairman introduces the top table and any other speakers and entertainers before reciting the Selkirk Grace:

‘Some hae meat and canna eat, And some would eat that want it, But we hae meat, and we can eat, Sae let the Lord be thankit’.

3. Piping in the haggis

The haggis is the crowning glory of a Burns Supper and, suitably, is piped in to an upstanding audience. Traditionally the chef carries the haggis in on a silver platter behind the piper and is followed by the person who will address the haggis.

4. The address to the haggis

The appointed speaker gives a dramatic rendition of Burns’ Address to a Haggis with a knife at the ready. After apologising for ‘killing’ the haggis, they then plunge the knife into the haggis and slice it open during the line ‘An’ cut you up wi’ ready slight’’ meaning ‘and cut you up with skill’. The recital ends with the platter being raised above their head whilst saying the triumphant words ‘Gie her a Haggis!’ to rapturous applause.

5.Toast to the haggis

The speaker then invites the guests to toast the haggis and everyone, including the chef, raises their glasses and shouts ‘The Haggis’ before enjoying a dram. The haggis is then piped back out to be prepared for dinner.

6. The meal

Spicy haggis, meat or vegetarian, is traditionally served with buttery mashed neeps and tatties and sometimes a whisky cream sauce.

7. First entertainer

The Chairman introduces the first entertainer who then performs one of Burns’ songs or poems such as A Red, Red Rose or Tam O’ Shanter.

8. The immortal memory

The main speaker is introduced and gives an enthralling account of Burns’ life. His literary prowess, politics, nationalistic pride in Scotland, faults and humour should all be explored to give the audience an insight into Burns’ life and works in a witty, yet serious way. The speaker concludes with an invitation to join in a heart-felt toast: ‘To the Immortal Memory of Robert Burns’.

9. Second entertainer

More celebration of Burns with singing or a recital.

10. Toast to the lassies

A humorous speech written for the evening that gently ridicules the (few) shortcomings of women that aims to amuse both sides of the audience – ‘observations’ therefore should not be too cutting! Despite the initial mockery, the speech ends on a positive note with the speaker asking the men to raise their glasses in a toast ‘to the lassies’.

11. Third entertainer

More songs, recitals and music.

12. Reply to the toast to the lassies

The chance for a female speaker to retort with some good-natured jokes of her own, beginning with a sarcastic thanks on behalf of the women present for the previous speaker’s ‘kind’ words, before giving a lively response highlighting the foibles of the male race, using reference to Burns and the women in his life. Again, this speech finishes on a positive note.

13. Final entertainer

The last entertainer bravely faces a merry crowd for some final songs and readings.

14. Vote of thanks

A vote of thanks is made to everyone who has made the evening such a roaring success, from the chef and speakers to the guests.

15. Auld Sang Syne

A Burns Supper traditionally ends with the singing of Burns’ famous song about parting, Auld Lang Syne. Everyone joins hands in a large circle and sings the words together and at the line ‘And here’s a hand’, you cross each of your hands over to rejoin those standing on either side of you.

Find out more stories like this one with the historical map in Timeline Trip Edinburgh

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22 Sep

Witches

Timeline trip Edinburgh, Witches 002

The paranoia for witchcraft in Edinburgh

In the late Middle Ages some people were prosecuted in Scotland for harm done through witchcraft, which led to the passing of the Witchcraft Act in 1563 and those consulting witches or practicing witchcraft would be accused of capital crimes. The North Berwick Witch trials were the first major series of trials under the new act.

Timeline trip Edinburgh, Witches 001

They began in 1589 and James VI played an important role as he considered himself a victim and investigator. When James VI came back from Denmark there was a big storm in the middle of the sea, unnatural, according to James. The King was very interested in witchcraft and wrote a treaty on witchcraft in 1597 called Daemonologie.

Timeline trip Edinburgh, Witches 002

Between the late 16th and 18th centuries more than 4,000 people were accused of witchcraft in Scotland and around 1,500 of them were executed, being Lowland women most of the victims. The English and Scottish parliaments merged in 1707 and the new British parliament repealed the 1563 Act in 1736.

Find out more stories like this one with the historical map in Timeline Trip Edinburgh

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27 Aug

The Virgin Money Fireworks Concert

The Virgin Money Fireworks Concert is not only the finale to the Edinburgh International Festival but marks an unforgettable close to Edinburgh’s festival season.

The display, set against the stunning backdrop of the iconic Edinburgh Castle, has been designed by internationally-renowned fireworks artist Keith Webb of Pyrovision.

Monday 31 August 2015

This year’s Virgin Money Fireworks Concert brings Edinburgh’s summer festival season to a spectacular conclusion, now on the last Monday evening. With a celebration of dance music the concert sets stirring and delightful music with an outstanding and sparkling visual extravaganza.

The Edinburgh Secondary Schools Orchestra and members of the Scottish Chamber Orchestra’s Vibe project present a special programme of live music that none can miss.

14 Aug

Edinburgh International Book Festival

Time for books and letters in the city

Literature has been an important part of the Edinburgh’s history. In fact, the capital of Scotland was designated the first UNESCO City of Literature in 2004. It was not a casuality, during its history Edinburgh has seen lots of writers and it has been scenario of several novels. Indeed, every single corner in Edinburgh has its magic and the city is full of book shops.

edinburgh_international_book_festival_001 http://timelinetrip.com/
As a part of this love for the literature, the Edinburgh International Book Festival began in 1983 and is one of the most important events every summer. Although it was biennal at first, the Book Festival became yearly in 1997. Nowadays, Charlotte Square, sited in the New Town, is the Festival’s home and its gardens are transformed into a tended village with a really nice atmosphere which are visited by around 200.000 people every year.

edinburgh_international_book_festival_002 http://timelinetrip.com/

The Festival is one of the most famous festivals of its kind in the world and includes a high profile debates and discussions series. Workshops, storytelling, panel discussions or book signings are some of the activities of the festival. Also, writers from all over the world are involved on it in forums in which readers can exchange thoughts and opinions with them.

Find out more stories like this one with the historical map in Timeline Trip Edinburgh

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29 Jul

Edinburgh is already available

Today we are proud to introduce Timeline Trip Edinburgh. The perfect app to discover Edinburgh through the historical maps and find out how the city has evolved and why it is World Heritage. Available in Android and iOS (tablet and smartphone)

Travel through time and get to know Edinburgh in a different way. Use GPS and walk the old maps to discover the secrets, legends, characters, pubs and stories from different eras of Edinburgh, The Stuart’s, The Union of the Crowns, the Scottish Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution in Scotland or XXI century Edinburgh.

LineScreenshotEdinburgh

Discover the secret Edinburgh and understand why it is World Heritage.

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